Cycling on the pavement …

With 7% of journeys made by bike and around a third of the population using a cycle of some description once a month or more, Richmond has some of the best cycling stats in outer London.

Spotted in Hampton, via Google Streetview

Spotted in Hampton, via Google Streetview

However, we get asked regularly about cycling on the pavement. The law is clear, you shouldn’t cycle on a pavement unless it is marked as shared use. That said, many shared routes are poorly sign-posted and the government has long recognised that there are many reasons people cycle on the pavement, ranging from things most people would find acceptable to the completely unacceptable.

Richmond Cycling Campaign doesn’t endorse cycling on the pavement but we understand why a lot of people do it and that’s why we’ve been talking to the South Richmond Neighbourhood Team Safer Pavements team (led by Alan Laird and with the support of Pam Fleming, and others) about gathering more information and looking at possible solutions.

Our view is that people cycle on the pavement because it feels safer than being on the road. Whether you’re cycling on your own or cycling with your family, the absence of proper cycling infrastructure in the borough causes many routes to be intimidating and unpleasant. We urge anyone who has chosen to cycle on the pavement or in shared use areas to show courtesy and consideration to pedestrians.

If you’ve experienced cycling on the pavement or if you do cycle on the pavement please contact us (info@richmondlcc.co.uk), or the South Richmond Neighbourhood Watch Safer Pavements team (richmondsaferpavements2018@gmail.com), with some more information, and we’ll try to collate what we hear.

11 thoughts on “Cycling on the pavement …

  1. Children should be allowed to cycle on the pavement. I know this can make walking more difficult and especially for people who already have difficulties of one sort or another, but the roads are far too dangerous for children on bicycles. To make cycling off the pavement safe enough for children we a great deal more space given over to cycle paths, ideally separated from road traffic, as opposed to the white lines marking a narrow lane for bicycles, frequently blocked by parked cars and which disappear at every dangerous junction.

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