Rides for Explorers – Off Road in Surrey to Norbury Park – 5th July

Meet Twickenham Riverside 10.15.

Norbury 023

We head South via Kingston and Tolworth before heading away from the traffic along the Hogsmill and then through Horton Country Park and Ashstead Common. Emerging in Leatherhead we pass through the Mole gap before climbing to Norbury Park – Southern England’s best approximation to an alpine meadow. A Track takes us to Brockets Farm for lunch and our return journey features a foot/cycle bridge across the Mole , Oxstead Common and Claygate woods. 37 miles with a serious hill. This has been done on a fixer but not-over-narrow tyres would be comfortable.

Route

Just 2 of us again. Ok there had been a sprinkling of rain but we enjoyed decent weather that became sunny by lunch time. With the dry weather the trails were mud-free is a bit bumpy but we certainly got away from traffic and enjoyed lots of greenery.

Sandycombe Road – safety with paint and a bit of tarmac.

The council is consulting on fixing Sandycombe Road (see here), in an attempt to deal with safety and congestion concerns.

Can this fix Sandycombe Road?  Probably not.

Can this fix Sandycombe Road? Probably not.

Sadly the consultation seems mostly to be about painting, making it easier to drive up and down, and ignoring cycling or walking as options. Sandycombe Road is one of three separate routes that can get you from the A316 to Kew Bridge / the South Circular, but it’s also a way for lots of people to access their homes.

We think Sandycombe would benefit from:

  • Filtered permeability (see here). This would prevent people using the road as a rat run, but would allow buses to carry on using it, and maintain access for residents
  • 20mph. Many people don’t travel down here at much more than 20mph, but there are some who do, and this is one of the areas that made it very clear that it wanted speeds cut. We won’t see more people cycling on this road if speeds aren’t cut, especially as these designs will likely increase speeds
  • Enhanced traffic calming measures. The raised tables are a good start at this, but they are only a start – there are all sorts of other ways engineers have in their arsenal to calm traffic in an area like this

Frankly, it would also benefit from losing its designation as a ‘B’ road – no-one should be lead to Sandycombe Road because they think it’s a key arterial route.

The council designs – which add more pavement parking like this, at the expense of people choosing to walk – is likely to cost a lot of money for no benefit to cycling, and precious little to anyone else, we think.

Finally, did you know there are plans to build a primary school at the top of Sandycombe Road, on the Manor Circus roundabout? If this goes ahead, all bets are likely to be off for safe traffic or pleasant walking in this area. 

So please write to the council using their form (here), the engineer’s email (Lisa Fenn at highwaysandtransport@richmond.gov.uk) or email us your comments and we’ll share them.

Please tell the council:

  1. Traffic volumes need to fall on Sandycombe Road
  2. Speeds need to fall on the road
  3. Through / non-local traffic should be discouraged
  4. More focus needs to be given in the designs to walking and cycling

And let us know your comments, below!

 

Come for a ride, Mr. Wells

Hello Jason,

We’d like to invite you to come out on a ride with Richmond Cycling. A few years ago, local paper the Richmond Magazine had a very unfortunate editorial. We invited the editor to come for a ride with us to understand cycling in the borough a bit better, and now we’d like to extend the same offer to you.

(Courtesy GB Cycling Embassy http://www.cycling-embassy.org.uk/good-cycling-facility-of-the-week)

How we’d like cycling to be (Courtesy GB Cycling Embassy http://www.cycling-embassy.org.uk/good-cycling-facility-of-the-week)

The cycle lane along Priory Lane is a terrible facility, but we understand why many people wouldn’t see that, so we’d welcome the opportunity to show you why we campaign so hard for proper facilities for cycling in the borough.

Yours,

Richmond Cycling Campaign

 

More parking, please!

The council is soliciting ideas for more cycle parking, so we and our members are happy to oblige – though when you see pictures like this, it’s not hard to see where might be good locations!

This one is in central Richmond, just outside Whole Foods, and a number of member have complained of it being constantly full. But to add to this, members have suggested:

  • Homebase on Manor Road
  • Pretty much anywhere in Kew village
  • By the shops on Friars Stile Road
  • High Park Road Kew
  • Medical centre in Richmond
  • Richmond Green
  • Richmond Station
  • Kew Station – both sides
  • Mortlake Station
  • Kew Gardens – Victoria Gate and Elizabeth Gate

Feeder Ride to London Freecycle

Wide
Official LCC event

Led ride from Richmond upon Thames to FreeCycle 2015

Join a family-friendly ride  to and from the RideLondon FreeCycle 2015, led by experienced ride leaders from London Cycling Campaign’s Richmond Group.

Route: Richmond to Green Park (Constitution Hill)
Start point: The Little Green, Richmond TW9 1QL
End point: Green Park (Constitution Hill)
Start time: 10:15
Distance: 10 miles
Return ride start point: Green Park (Constitution Hill)
Return ride start time: 15:00  / (15.15 at Hyde Park gates. )

This ride is one of 31 led rides organised by LCC to the 2015 FreeCycle, aimed at giving less confident cyclists the opportunity to ride into the FreeCycle event on a pre-planned route.

To see details of all 31 rides and register to join this ride, please see the Guided Rides Schedule on the FreeCycle website at: http://www.prudentialridelondon.co.uk/The_Events/FreeCycle/Rider_Info/Guided_Rides.htm

The RideLondon FreeCycle offers the chance for all the family to enjoy a traffic-free route on closed roads through central London, passing some of the capital’s most iconic landmarks. Everyone is welcome, no matter what their age or ability. Cyclists may cycle at any pace and as many times round the route as they like, stopping along the way to enjoy a range of free bike-based entertainment and activities at Festival Zones.

We had about 100 cyclists riding into London and nearly 50 riding home. Immediate reaction was positive despite the traffic between Chiswick and Kensington, the awkwardness of turning out of Kensington Gardens and a jam on Hammersmith Bridge.

One way streets – an easy way to improve cycling.

In the City of London, virtually every one way street is two-way for cycling.

And we think it should be the same in Richmond. The addition of one-way cycling in Holly Road in Twickenham has demonstrated that we can do this in our borough, so we’ve put together a list of the roads where we think the council can implement this quickly and inexpensively.

You can see the details on this Cyclescape page, assembled by Richmond Cycling members – full of simple suggestions like “Can we cycle both ways round Richmond Green?”

Richmond Green Cyclescape proposalThe streets we’ve identified so far are:

  • Somerton Avenue @ Clifford
  • South Worple Way East End
  • Kingsway
  • Richmond Hill
  • Ormond Road
  • Paradise Road
  • George Street
  • Eton Street
  • Richmond Green
  • Grove Road
  • Park Road
  • Glebe Way
  • 1st Cross Road
  • Kew Station Approach
  • Wiggins Lane Ham
  • The Vineyard
  • Cumberland Road
  • Leybourne Park
  • Priests Bridge

17 June update

We’ve asked the council about these, and also added the following:

  • Clarence Street in Richmond.
  • Portland Terrace (and Richmond Green generally)
  • Quadrant Road / Duke St
  • King Street, Richmond
  • Nightingale Lane, Richmond

If you want to comment, you can do so on the Cyclescape threads, on this post, email us at info@richmondlcc.co.uk, tell us on Facebook, or tweet us @richmondcycling.

 

 

 

Come and see us at the May Fair!

We’ll be at Richmond’s May Fair, on Saturday! (Come along from 10am – Richmond Green)

We’ve got a Brompton fold compo, Dr. Bike, lots of goodies from local bike shops, plus maps and all sorts of other things going on!

Thanks to local stores and businesses -

 

 

For all these brilliant gifts and prizes! Fair goodiesFair goodies

 

 

 

 

Come along to see what you can win, and support cycling in Richmond-upon-Thames.

 

Rides for Explorers – over the North Downs

Sunday 7th June – meet Diana Fountain Car Park in Bushy Park 10am.

Steve Armstrong will lead this ride through Kingston out to Chessington then through Oxshott and surrounding villages over Bagden Hill  to Westhumble.  Then up Boxhill with stop at Boxhill cafe for refreshments. Return via Ashtead and Epsom Common to starting point. 42 miles hilly. Back around 3.30 pm.

Contact Steve on armstrong.steven@sky.com