Time for 20mph in Richmond

(Updated below – see the local 20′s plenty group, here.)

We think 20mph is plenty for our borough. Richmond has few roads where you ever really want to be doing 30mph, and the national (and international) evidence is mounting up.

You don’t think Three filmed this on a 30mph street, do you?

More and more, we’re hearing from other London boroughs, other areas of the UK, and from throughout Europe, about how slower speeds in residential and populous areas is a good thing for everyone involved.

But the council aren’t keen at all. Despite the Twickenham Action Plan including a 20mph limit, they’ve rejected a number of attempts to have specific roads go 20mph. Until recently, what you needed to do was this:

  1. Ask all the people in your road if they wanted a 20mph zone.
  2. Show the council that you had a majority – bearing in mind that anyone not answering is obviously a ‘no’.
  3. Have the council come round and consult again.
  4. And then get everyone to respond. And I mean everyone - because again, if they don’t reply, then the council will count that as a ‘no’.

So, you’d either need 51% of the voters to turn out, and every single person to vote for you, or if they all turned out, you’d need 51% of the voters.

Compare that to the council’s Heathrow referendum in 2013. On a 41% turnout, they had 72% against a third runway. If that had been a 20mph consultation, it would have failed. but here Lord True said “The people have spoken”. (Have a look at the lengthy discussion at the time on Twickerati, if you want to celebrate just how hard they made it.)

We think cycling needs somewhere safe, pleasant and calm, and if you read London Cycling Campaign’s ‘Space 4 Cycling’ pages, you’ll see how 20mph zones are a key component of this.

So take a moment and tell the council that you want 20mph using one of the consultations going on:

Want to know more about 20mph? Try the 20’s Plenty site, read a paper from the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, find out why Bristol is going 20mph, and Camden, and Islington

Oh, and here’s what Transport for London says:

 And an update: pop along to Richmond’s local 20′s Plenty group, and sign their petition. 

Twickenham – we had one step forward, now it’s two steps back.

[vimeo 61451459 w=500&h=280]
Current view of Twickenham filmed by local cyclist Mathieu

They’re starting the detailed designs for Twickenham, and it’s not good news.

We’ve tried hard to engage the council, and to push the focus that both LCC and the Mayor’s Office are giving to ‘Going Dutch’. A previous meeting seemed to indicate that things were really starting to look positive, but the new plans (PDF here) are very disappointing indeed. Advisory cycle lanes that share the width of the nearside motor vehicle lane and disappear where they’re needed most. At junctions, where most collisions occur, those on bicycles have to fend for themselves, great if you’re trying to cycle to school with your children. And the newly located bus stops, aside from inconveniencing those who visit Twickenham by bus, add new dangers along Cross Deep.

Spot the cycle lane - now you see it, now you don't (click for full drawing)

In the week that saw the first death in London on a hire bike, Richmond Council is again offering us a design based on the discredited and dangerous facilities that bloggers like Twowheelsgood and Citycyclists are directly linking with the continuing maiming and death of cyclists in our city. A painted line will do nothing to protect you from an impatient lorry driver.

Cycling *is* a safe thing to do, and our borough is a pretty safe place to do it, as well. But we know from report after report that the people who aren’t already using a bicycle have probably chosen not to get on a bicycle because they perceive it to be unsafe. And the new Twickenham plan isn’t going to help.

We’ve written to the council to tell them how concerned we are (you can see the full text at the bottom of this post). Perhaps Richmond can win its Mini-Holland bid, because there’s indications that Twickenham might be partially fixed with that, but we can’t risk it: right now the borough is bidding to spend £8m of TfL’s cash on the new Twickenham, but it’s neutral at best for cycling. We think Twickenham is somewhere that should welcome families and visitors by bicycle, whether they’ve come from nearby, or from the station, or are just popping in to get a loaf of bread or a coffee.

The Cycling Liaison Group meets this Thursday – the meeting is open to everyone so join us to ask the council why they’re giving so little priority to persuading people that cycling is a pleasant attraction option for getting around our area.

If you’re planning to come, drop us a note at campaign@richmondlcc.co.uk if you need any more info.

 

Dear Richmond,

Thank you for sending us the detailed plans for Twickenham.

Unfortunately, it is very hard to see how RCC can offer any endorsement for the plans as they stand. As you know, we were very pleased to see Andrew Gilligan and Boris Johnson bring together a real commitment to cycling for everyone. We believe that getting on a bicycle can – and should – be the most obvious travel choice for the majority of journeys in our borough. We also believe that to get people to consider cycling as a transport choice it needs to be safe and feel safe. Survey after survey tells us that people who don’t cycle equate sharing the road with HGVs and buses with a very visceral feeling of danger.

You’ll have seen recently that the local police are finally enforcing the cycle lane across the bridge by the station: the ongoing issues here are a perfect demonstration of why cycling needs its own space in the new Twivckenham, and yet the nearest concession to any new space comprises a couple of advanced stop lines.

These plans give little confidence or succour to mums and dads who want to cycle with their children to school, or indeed anywhere else in Twickenham. Instead they combine all the features which make cycling in the United Kingdom a specialist contact sport. They include;  incomplete routes; junctions that require a cyclist to force her way into the main traffic flow; conflict-inducing pinch points, and hair-raising junctions.

RCC members have made a concerted effort to talk to the council about what might make Twickenham a good place for cycling, and it’s worth looking back to some of the meetings and discussions we’ve had, and some of the ideas which don’t seem to have made it out of our minutes of these meetings:

  • We discussed the broad (1.5m) central reservation, which could be narrowed to provide more space for cycle lanes. Not Present
  • We discussed colouring used to indicate cycling provision. Not Present
  • We discussed using ‘armadillos’, soft kerbs and a range of other techniques to indicate lane provision. Not Present.
  • We discussed how someone on a bicycle makes it from York Street across Cross Deep to Heath Road. Your new design doesn’t even provide a cycle lane for most of this journey.

A key point from the Gilligan review is that you can’t have a meaningful cycle route if you do nothing at the junctions. Yet this plan offers virtually no improvement at junctions compared to Twickenham currently. The mayor of London has a compelling vision for cycling for everyone in our city, and it is with huge regret that I have to tell you that I don’t think the plans that we’ve seen do anything to advance that vision.

Sincerely,

Richmond Cycling. Campaigns Coordinator.

You can see our minutes and notes about previous meetings at these links:

Twickenham could be great for cycling.

It’s beginning to look like the Twickenham Plan is now going to have many more improvements than we’d previously thought, to support people who want to cycle in the area. (If you want to see where we’ve been, you can check out our last post on the subject here.)

Last week, representatives from Richmond Cycling Campaign met officials from the planning department to look at their revised ideas for the new Twickenham (or “West Richmond“, as it might be….) (Full minutes of the meeting – PDF) This was a follow up to our last meeting in November.

And although Twickenham isn’t going to be a Dutch style cycling paradise, we think that what has been described to us is a radical departure from the first set of plans we saw. (For a great suggestion for what Twickenham could really look like, check out the ideas that Paul, one local father has been looking at.)

Some of the highlights

Perhaps most importantly, Twickenham was accepted to be a ‘major project’ in TfL terms. This means that we can expect it to fall into this statement in the latest ‘Vision for Cycling

.. we will closely monitor all major new planning applications, schemes and developments, such as Earl’s Court and Nine Elms, to promote meaningful pro-bike content and discourage antibike content.

Which means that we can hopefully rely on TfL to refuse to pay for this, unless they’re satisfied that being able to access the area safely by bicycle is a key element of the project.

King Street …

King Street (from Cross Deep to the London Road junction) will get 2m-wide cycle lanes beside a single 5m wide general traffic lane each way. In off peak hours – i.e. most of the day – this means you’ll be able to cycle quietly and confidently all the way along here. To complement this, the planners are aiming to make the Holly Road section bi-directional for cyclists, so that anyone going from Heath Road to London Road will not need to use the junction of doom (London Rd/King St/York St).

On the opposite side of the road, the engineers are looking at a cycling contraflow operating all the way along Church Street, so that you can approach from York Street, and cycle along Church Street, directly onto King Street, again without having to deal with the junction of doom.

A really important point about these lanes on King Street is that, although they won’t be mandatory lanes, the engineers are looking at ways to remove any chance of the conflict that cycling struggles with in other parts of the borough. As well as clear marking of the whole surface, they’re looking at some form of defined edge – such as the cat eye strips seen in the mayor’s new cycling vision – to really delineate the space.

… London Road …


London Road will have at least 1.5m of cycle lane along all of its length, although it looks like there’s still some design and thinking to be done at the fateful junction with King Street, because of the ongoing requirements to be able to get enough traffic through there, especially to allow buses to move smoothly.

… Cross Deep …


At the Cross Deep junction, they’re looking at including a new design for traffic lights which will give cyclists a head start, in an attempt to lower the level of conflict between transport modes (i.e. cars v. bicycles, bicycles v. pedestrians, etc.) This design is currently in testing at the Transport Research Laboratory, so we’ll need to wait on the results before we find out whether they’ll go ahead.

Also, the Cross Deep junction will apparently feature two 3m wide ‘general’ lanes, with a 2m wide cycle lane. This will ensure that anyone choosing to cycle on these sections will always be able to easily make their way to a safer position at the front of queuing traffic.

… & Parking and Railings

Not too much change here, partly because there’s no definite plan as to where all the cycle parking will go. There was some discussion around placing parking in the middle of King Street, like in Kensington High Street.

Kensington parking

Kensington parking (from Google Maps)

Obviously this wouldn’t be the only way to park, but it’s under consideration as an option. The removal of large sections of railing will also make a significant difference to the volume of cycle parking available in Twickenham, so if you have any strong opinions on where you think we should be parking, please tell us, and we’ll make sure it’s fed back to the council.

The removal will extend over almost every metre of railing present in Twickenham, including London Road and all the way to the station, which is going to be a huge improvement to the urban realm in the area, meaning you’ll be able to stop off more easily, and pedestrians will be able to cross at a point of their choosing, rather than being penned in to specific crossing points.

Some bonus tidbits

While we were there, we discussed some interesting background with the engineers. For example, they’ve surveyed the car parking provided in Twickenham, and they know that the main car parks have spare capacity at peak times.

They also discussed the impact that TfL requirements were having on planning and, interestingly for us, these seem very focussed on making sure buses can get through, which means that there’s a real change in direction from the ‘smoothing traffic flow‘ that has been a TfL stalwart for quite a while now.

Finally, it sounds like traffic volumes in Twickenham have been falling for a while now – we’ll try to get the figures for this, but it’ll make interesting reading, when considered against the plans for how traffic flows through the town centre.

London Road Roundabout – Did They Start Without Us?

TfL promised to review 100 of the worst junctions for cyclists last year, and you may have seen that work has begun on places like Waterloo Roundabout. But now someone’s told us that work has begun on the London Road junction in Twickenham (Streetview and map).

London Rd / Chertsey Rd from Google Maps: http://goo.gl/maps/DPIbH

RCC has looked at this before, (as has the local Green Party) as the junction doesn’t currently work for either walking or cycling, so it’s very worrying that work might be going ahead on this junction with no consultation and no documentation available. In our view it would be better to do nothing than to bridge the work on this junction, considering the volume of potential and actual use by all transport types.

So if they have started work on this, it’s a matter of some concern, and we need to find out what’s going on straight away. If you have a moment, ask your local GLA members (list here - Tony Arbour is member for the area, but others  have London-wide responsibility, like Stephen Knight), and email TfL (use this form or email Enquire@TfL.Gov.UK).

You can also ask your councillors to enquire as well, since it’s their borough …

Do let us know what you find out (at campaign@richmondlcc.co.uk) and we’ll keep this post updated.

Twickenham Consultation – January Update

Olympic Sporting Legacy with a new extreme sport - Dodge the Taxi Rank! (click for full plan - 5MB)

We went along to the Environment, Sustainability and Community Overview and Scrutiny Committee (trying saying that after a few jars!) meeting on Monday 7 January. We were hopeful that our comments made back in November would have been taken on board. This post by a local cyclist summed up the potential that could be achieved.

Sadly we were to be disappointed. Disjointed, advisory cycle lanes that form part of the nearside motor lane, no consideration at junctions other than ASLs, a taxi rank to dodge – you can read the full plans here (PDF 5MB) Not a design that parents will feel happy about cycling to school with their kids on. We were somewhat exasperated by the council boasting that they were being generous by giving 1.5 m cycle lanes. While this may be generous compared to the usual treatment in the borough (e.g. the recent cycle lanes on the approach to Richmond Bridge) this is the absolute minimum width recommended by the London Cycle Design Standards (yes, they do exist!). Perhaps the Richmond officers need a refresh.

Until the council treats cycling as a means of transport, with officers who actually use the designs they come up with, we won’t see more people taking to their bikes to cycle to work, school or the shops. Across London, other councils are waking up to this – read how Ealing council went to Copenhagen, even TfL are starting to rethink their designs. We only hope this will eventually happen in Richmond. In the meantime, here’s your Olympic legacy. Which is a shame, because when you look at this post by a local parent, you see what could have been achieved with the space available and some political will – a vibrant Twickenham people go to, not drive through.

London Road Cycle lane saved?

Twickenham Consultation – December Update

Since our last post on the subject of the Twickenham Town Centre proposals in October a lot has been going on in the background. There was the council cabinet meeting on 15 November and then we met with council officials on 23 November. So we felt it was worth putting up an update. For a reminder on the history of the changes have a look at this post.

Council Cabinet Meeting – 15 November 2012
Having found out from the council’s own safety audit states that the proposed changes changes were likely to lead to “an increase in cyclist/vehicular collisions or cyclist/pedestrian collisions” we went to this meeting determined to get the council to listen. There was a big turn out of cyclists at the meeting, many bringing placards to get across their frustrations. At that stage, there was still limited specific detail on what the council was actually proposing but there was an indication that the council was softening its position and that existing cycle lanes would be retained and new ones added. The most enlightening element of the meeting was that Cabinet Chair, Lord True, was genuinely shocked to hear that we were not allowed to discuss infrastructure issues at the council’s Cycling Liaison Group meetings. The council’s Cycling Champion was not in attendance at the cabinet meeting to explain why.

Meeting with Council Officers – 23 November
Perhaps prompted by the cabinet meeting, the council invited us sit down with the Principal Transport Planner on 23 November. This was a productive meeting and we came away with the following commitments:

  • Any cycle lanes now present will be preserved
  • Any bus lanes removed will be replaced by cycle lanes
  • Cycle lane width will be in addition to, not part of the motor lane width
  • Cycle lanes will be a minimum of 1.5m width
  • A push to provide proper crossings for pedestrians and cyclists on the A316 London Road roundabout (a long running campaign issue – http://is.gd/aszjUm)

We emphasised that safety at junctions still needed to be addressed and that we would need to see the firmed-up proposals before the go-ahead is given. No official minutes were produced of the meeting, but here are the notes that we took down and shared with the council after the meeting. It is a vast improvement of where we were at the start of the summer when all cycle lane provision was going to be removed.

Since November, we haven’t heard any more on the subject and our concern is that decisions are being made in the background without our knowledge. Perhaps we’re worrying without cause but our experiences with the council to date haven’t helped. We will continue keep the pressure on the council to stick to these commitments and look for opportunities to further improve the scheme.

This is what was originally proposed

What can you you?
There is a danger that despite everyone’s efforts, this will fall off the radar. With the upcoming Rugby World Cup, changes may be pushed through that in the long term compromise the safety and viability of Twickenham town centre for those that visit and work there. Contact your local councillors, the council’s Cycling Champion, Kat Harborne, the chair of the Transportation Committee Councillor Chris Harrison and the Principal Transport Planner Ben Fryer to make sure they haven’t forgotten and to get their commitment to the changes discussed in November.

Contact details for below:
Ben Fryer – ben.fryer@richmond.gov.uk
Councillor Katharine Harborne – Cllr.KHarborne@richmond.gov.uk (Council Cycling Champion)
Councillor Chris Harrison – Cllr.CHarrison@richmond.gov.uk (Chair of the Transportation Committee Councillor)
List of Ward Councillors and their contact details – http://is.gd/QFOttI

If you’re writing to your Councillor, feel free to cc us via info@richmondlcc.co.uk and we’ll keep a note of it.

London Road Cycle lane saved?

Twickenham Consultation – Reprieve or just a stay of execution?

Bow Roundabout

Post updated 15 November 2012
October marks the one year anniversary of the death of local cyclist Brian Dorling on one of the Cycle Superhighways at the Bow Roundabout near the Olympic Park, where poor road design contributed to making Bow such a dangerous junction, where two people were to die within the space of 3 weeks. It also marks the 15th birthday of the London Road Cycle lane which Richmond Council are planning to remove.

Following on from the Cycle Liaison Group meeting on 4th October, the council issued a press release on the 11th October saying that they were no longer planning on ratifying the changes to Twickenham Town Centre, including the removal of the mandatory London Road cycle lane, at the Council Cabinet meeting on 18th October. The plans will now be debated at the Council Cabinet meeting on 15th NovemberYou can read the full detail on their website, but the point that caught our eye from the release was:

“This is to enable … more clear communication from the Council regarding cycle lanes”

If this means they listen to the safety concerns of those affected by the proposals that will be great. If it just means more communication about what they are currently proposing (i.e. installation of advisory off peak lanes which form part of the nearside motor lane) then it will be a disappointment. It does, however, show they now realise the original plans were inadequate. No matter how many ways they put it, sharing a lane with an impatient HGV at peak time is no more pleasant at 20mph that it is at 30mph (particularly when average speeds at peak times are closer to 10mph), and no number of Advanced Stop Lines at junctions will make cycling through Twickenham more pleasant if you can’t get to them in the first place. At peak times, when parents are cycling to school with their kids or people are cycling to work, the most protection is needed (57% of incidents occur at peak times). The council’s own safety audit of the plans, obtained via a Freedom of Information request, show there will be an increased risk of cyclist/motorist collisions under the new plans. Even the DfT states cycle lanes should be provided for roads with this volume of traffic, even at 20mph.

This is what you're losing - London Road before and after (thanks to Paul James for visualising for us) We would love to show you the actual layout, but the council haven't produced it yet.

We plan to use this time to continue to try and work with the council to develop the current proposals into something that will change Twickenham into somewhere to go to, not just somewhere to drive through. It is also about more than just cyclists, but also enhancing Twickenham for pedestrians and those who use public transport. There is scope, for example, to retain the bus stops and have protected lanes as per this example:

Safely integrating all modes of transport through good design

What can you you?
We need everyone who is concerned about what Richmond Council to make their voice heard while there is still time. Contact your local councillors, the council’s Cycling Champion, Kat Harborne, the chair of the Transportation Committee Councillor Chris Harrison and the Principal Transport Planner Ben Fryer. These are the people with the most influence on whether we lose the existing cycle provision in Twickenham. Thank them for listening to our concerns and putting back their ratification. Share with them your vision of an inviting Twickenham, where parents are happy to cycle to school or to the riverside with their kids, where those commuting to work at peak times aren’t sharing a lane with a HGV and where Twickenham maximises it’s potential as a place to visit.

TfL are also a major stakeholder in the changes. We are in discussions with them, but we ask you all to share your concerns with them directly.

Also, we don’t want this to disappear off the radar, so help us maintain the high profile of the proposals by writing to the Richmond Twickenham Times

Contact details for all are below:
Ben Fryer – ben.fryer@richmond.gov.uk
Councillor Katharine Harborne – Cllr.KHarborne@richmond.gov.uk (Council Cycling Champion)
Councillor Chris Harrison – Cllr.CHarrison@richmond.gov.uk (Chair of the Transportation Committee Councillor)
List of Ward Councillors and their contact details – http://is.gd/QFOttI
Transport for London – LONDONSTREETS@tfl.gov.uk
Richmond and Twickenham Times  - lettersrtt@london.newsquest.co.uk

You can also ask the council a question either in person or electronically and they have to respond

And of course, put the Council cabinet meeting on the 15th November in the diary. This is the best chance to get your points put directly to the cabinet members responsible (full list of cabinet members and contact details here) You can even register to ask a question on the night.

If you’re writing to your Councillor or the paper, feel free to cc us in via info@richmondlcc.co.uk and we’ll keep a note of it.

Again, we would reiterate that we would like the council to consider the safety concerns that everyone has expressed and:

  • That they review the principals of LCC’s Love London Go Dutch campaign and incorporate the best practice from the Netherlands and Denmark to provide protected cycle lanes. For example, the space is there to do this and still provide wider pavements on King Street. Have a look at a similar street in the Netherlands and these examples clearly demonstrate there is room to achieve this
  • They review why two motor lanes are required by TfL on London Road in each direction, given each end of the road is single carriageway.
  • Ensure that any on road cycle lanes provided are mandatory, full time cycle lanes, which do not share the space of the near side motor lane
  • That the safety of intersections are reviewed as part of the design so that cycle lanes don’t disappear when the going gets tough. These should include as a minimum:
    • Access to Twickenham railway station from London Road
    • Access from King Street to York Road (going to Richmond)
    • Access from King Street to Wharf Lane/Twickenham Riverside
    • Access from King Street to Church Street (travelling from Cross Deep)

Putting the record straight
We would also like to counter some of the claims that the council has made in the emails that many of our followers have passed on to us. As an organisation, we’re saddened to be accused by the council of misrepresentation of their plans. We’ve only ever reported what the council has stated – the initial rejection by two thirds of the removal of the London Road cycle lane by their consultation and their plans to replace the existing cycle lanes and bus lanes with advisory, off peak only cycle lanes.

In the original proposals that formed the consultation, as far as we can see (and we’ve poured over them extensively) there was no mention of the provision of these advisory cycle lanes. We would expect that cycling facilities – including cycle lanes – to be designed into the road layout from the start and clearly articulated on the consultation documents.  Since putting in any kind of bike lane may materially affect traffic flow and road-user’s experience (both cyclists and motorists) – this “bolt-on” approach of bike lanes is not the approach that would normally be taken in a major infrastructure project.  Apple wouldn’t sell many iPhones if the designers weren’t mobile phone users, yet here we have road plans being pushed without taking into account the safety concerns of those who will have to use them.

We’ve heard Cllr Harborne on several radio stations sharing her vision for the Olympic Legacy for the borough through the Strictly Cycling project in schools the council is involved in. Wouldn’t it be great to have a legacy which leaves one of the main parts of the Olympic route safe for families to cycle to school on?

For the background to the proposals, going back to 2011, have a look at this post.

Soon to be no more?

Twickenham Consultation – The Next Steps

This is what you're losing - London Road before and after (thanks to Paul James for visualising for us)

There was a big a big attendance of cyclists at Thursday’s Cycle Liaison Group meeting with Richmond council, showing the strength of feeling about the changes to Twickenham town centre. London Cycling Campaign covered the subject on their website. Many told us they had never taken part in a meeting like this before, but felt compelled to come along to make their voice heard. A big thank you them and to the many others who couldn’t but emailed their support and a thank you to Richmond council for adding the subject to the agenda.

The meeting can be split into two parts – the original agenda (in which we learnt a lot about bat friendly lighting) and the bit that everyone went to hear about. Local cyclist Tim Lennon wrote up very effectively about both parts.

CLG Meeting – Part 1 Roundup

CLG Meeting – Part 2 Roundup

The council has stated that it is listening to our concerns, which is welcome to hear, and that the changes are not yet a done deal, though we are concerned about previous information that they would be ratified at the Council Cabinet meeting on 18th October. They now say that they are going to install cycle lanes throughout Twickenham town centre, but these still appear to be the advisory, off peak only, cycle lanes, which will form part of the nearside motor lane, rather than an extra width. We still feel strongly that this is inadequate, given at peak times, when parents are cycling to school with their kids or people are cycling to work, the most protection is needed. In the words of one of the attendees, ’they are as useful as a chocolate teapot’ but it does show they now realise the original plans were inadequate.  No detail is available on these lanes or consideration of the safety of  junctions. There is no detail on when the new updated proposals will be available for review. We hope that, unlike the recent cycle lane installed on the approach to Richmond bridge, the lane just doesn’t peter out when the going gets tough.

The subject of our next steps will be on the agenda at our monthly meeting, this Monday 8 October, at 8pm in the Old Ship pub in Richmond. We shall discuss what we do next, including follow up with TfL to understand their involvement. TfL will be critical, as they are part funding the changes.  Come along and share your views, or if you can’t make it, email us on info@richmondlcc.co.uk.

There is still some way to go on this, and we take the council’s willingness to listen as a positive and that they will take this opportunity to make a Twickenham, as we’ve said all along, somewhere to go to, not just drive through. We would like the council to consider our concerns and:

  • That they consider the principals of LCC’s Love London Go Dutch campaign and incorporate the best practice from the Netherlands and Denmark to provide protected cycle lanes. For example, the space is there to do this and still provide wider pavements on King Street. Have a look at a similar street in the Netherlands.
  • They review why two motor lanes are required by TfL on London Road in each direction, given each end of the road is single carriageway.
  • Ensure that any on road cycle lanes provided are mandatory, full time cycle lanes, which do not share the space of the near side motor lane
  • That the safety of intersections are reviewed as part of the design so that cycle lanes don’t disappear when the going gets tough. These should include as a minimum:
    • Access to Twickenham railway station from London Road
    • Access from King Street to York Road (going to Richmond)
    • Access from King Street to Wharf Lane/Twickenham Riverside
    • Access from King Street to Church Street (travelling from Cross Deep)

As Tim puts it, everyone should be concerned about the provision of cycling infrastructure in Twickenham, regardless of whether you cycle or not.

‘What can I do?’
We’ve had this question from many of you (and thank you for all your supportive emails, they are appreciated), so here’s our rundown of what you can do to make your voice heard:

- Write to Richmond and Twickenham Times to express your view – lettersrtt@london.newsquest.co.uk

- Write to your local ward Councillor - This nifty site will let you know who your councillors are

- Write to the Council’s Cycling Champion Councillor Katharine Harborne (Cllr.KHarborne@richmond.gov.uk) and chair of the Transportation Committee Councillor Chris Harrison (Cllr.CHarrison@richmond.gov.uk). They have the most influence on whether the views of cyclists are incorporated.

- Ask the council a question – you can do it in person or electronically and they have to respond

- Come along to the Council cabinet meeting on the 18th October - This is the best chance to get your points put directly to the cabinet members responsible (full list of cabinet members and contact details here) You can even register to ask a question on the night.

If you’re writing to your Councillor or the paper, feel free to cc us in via info@richmondlcc.co.uk and we’ll keep a note of it.

To help, here’s some background reading to the history of the proposals:
June 2011 we commented on the Twickenham Area Action Plan, where the word cycle was only mentioned once
http://www.richmondlcc.co.uk/2011/06/17/i-want-to-ride-my-bicycle-i-want-to-ride-my-bike/

October 2011, we were hopeful as based on the feedback on the consultation (ending July 2011), cycling started to appear and promises were made
http://www.richmondlcc.co.uk/2011/10/25/maybe-they-are-listening/

January 2012 – a very cold month, and the next consultation stage. We got lots of feedback from local cyclists, and Nick provided a very detailed submission
http://www.richmondlcc.co.uk/2012/01/18/twickenham-town-centre/

July 2012 – and we find out what the proposals are – removal of cycle and bus lanes and a consultation (in the form of a tick box, do you support these proposals) comes out. The results were promising, 67% opposed the removal of the existing London Road mandatory cycle lane. Surely they would now listen.
http://www.richmondlcc.co.uk/2012/07/25/twickenham-street-scene-and-highways-scheme-consultation/

September 2012 - We find out the cycle lane removal is to proceed but that there is now the addition of off peak advisory cycle lanes, though these are not shown on any of the consultation drawings. Anyone who works on major projects, will tell you that such a detail would not be omitted until later – it would be a key design variable incorporated from the start
http://www.richmondlcc.co.uk/2012/09/25/twickenham-consultation-cycle-lane-removal-proceeds/

October 2012 - After several attempts, the council agrees to update the agenda for the upcoming CLG meeting to include discussion of the cycle lanes.
http://www.richmondlcc.co.uk/2012/10/03/twickenham-consultation-cycle-liaison-group-meeting-4-october-2012/

Local blogger Tim Lennon stated very simply the flaws with what the council is proposing.

Interesting debate in the comments section to the article in the Richmond and Twickenham Times.

Confirmed to soon be no more